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Carothers

Carothers

An artist named Carothers was among the first cartoonists to provide art for The University Weekly. This 1909 sketch of an Arkansas player carrying the ball shows a trampled Henderson College with future season rivals waiting. Under the coaching of Hugo Bezdek, the Arkansas football team went undefeated during 1909, beating both the University of Oklahoma and Louisiana State University by wide margins.


Chet Lauck

Chet Lauck

In 1924, Chet Lauck drew occasional cartoons for The Arkansas Traveler, including this one that played on the theme of homecoming. Lauck went on to fame as half of the nationally broadcast "Lum & Abner" radio show.


Chris Allen

Chris Allen

Homecoming proved a recurrent theme for artists. In 1926, Chris Allen drew his own theory of why alumni return to campus.


Maxine McCatherine

Maxine McCatherine

When a women's edition was published in 1927, Maxine McCatherine provided artwork showing a student printing the paper through a wringer-washer and thanking readers for their support.


Jack Hobson

Jack Hobson

Perhaps inspired by the woodcuts of Richard A. Loederer, an artist who illustrated one of Vance Randolph's folklore books, "Ozark Holler," Jack Hobson cut several illustrations including this one for The Traveler during the mid-1930s.


Harold Keller

Harold Keller

Using only a pen and ink, Harold Keller created cartoons with clever humor in the 1940s.


Phil Stratton

Phil Stratton

The Traveler benefited from a flood of talent among the returning GIs after World War II. Phil Stratton was among the bumper crop of cartoonists. This 1946 cartoon showed his alter ego dreaming he was back in a foxhole dreaming of being home.


Harold Holmes

Harold Holmes

When The Traveler got in an editorial war with the owner of the Uark Theater in 1946, cartoonist Harold Holmes weighed in with an illustrated opinion.


Mort Stern

Mort Stern

Complementing his sports writing, Mort Stern was among the best illustrators to work at The Traveler, depicting athletic players for The Traveler's sports pages in 1946.


Bruce Plante

Bruce Plante

After initiates of a fraternity drew the ire of a Fayetteville police officer in 1975 by streaking from the chapter's old fraternity house to its new house, the officer drew his gun, ordered the streakers to stop and then fired his gun twice into the air in an effort to stop them. Apparently, the strategy only made them run faster. Bruce Plante caught the flavor of the event by drawing the officer as a well-armed bandito, rampaging through campus. In addition to providing editorial cartoons, Plante also wrote a comic strip called "Sheepskins." He continues to draw cartoons for the Chatanooga Times Free Press in Tennessee.


Mike Gauldin

Mike Gauldin

A perennial problem since students started driving vehicles to campus, the lack of parking drove Mike Gauldin in 1979 to illustrate how far away visitors to the campus should expect to park. Gauldin, who later was an editor of The Traveler, also drew a comic strip for the paper called "Wild Bill." Gauldin later served as press secretary for then-Gov. Bill Clinton and worked in the U.S. Department of Interior in Washington after Clinton became president. He continues to work in Washington while drawing editorial cartoons for the Arkansas Times in Little Rock.


Brandt Rydell

Brandt Rydell

In 1994, a student media fee was proposed to provide a consistent revenue source for The Traveler and the Razorback yearbook. Cartoonist Brandt Rydell, who also drew a comic strip called "Thor and the Werewolf," penned an editorial cartoon about the situation. Rydell had perhaps the longest tenure among all cartoonists at The Traveler. He started drawing for the paper in 1991, got to poke fun at Bill Clinton in 1992 and lampooned Razorback fans in 1994 after the basketball team won the national championship: "You mean the season is over!"